ECR Members' Publications

Meredith Tax, “The Revolution in Rojava,” April 22, 2015, Dissent.

 

An overview of the revolution, including the fight against ISIS and rescue of the Yazidis, the PKK’s origins and their paradigm shift to democratic confederalism, with a call to the international left to pay attention.

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Meredith Tax, “Turkey is Supporting the Syrian Jihadis Washington Says It Wants to Fight,” Sept. 16, 2016, The Nation.

Turkey’s recent “battle” to evict ISIS from Jarabulus was a fake; article documents consistent Turkish enabling of ISIS and direct support to other jihadi militias including those associated with al Qaeda.

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Meredith Tax, A Road Unforeseen. Bellevue Literary Press, 2016. Book. 

A Road Unforeseen recounts the dramatic, underreported history of the Rojava Kurds, whose all-women militia was instrumental in the perilous mountaintop rescue of tens of thousands of civilians besieged in Iraq. Up to that point, the Islamic State had seemed invincible. Yet these women helped vanquish them, bringing the first half of the refugees to safety within twenty-four hours. Who are the revolutionary women of Rojava and what lessons can we learn from their heroic story? How does their political philosophy differ from that of Iraqi Kurdistan, the Islamic State, and Turkey? And will the politics of the twenty-first century be shaped by the opposition between these political models?

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Meredith Tax, “Showdown in Afrin: Turkey’s Attack on Syria’s Kurds Threatens That Country’s Most Democratic, Pluralist Force.” January 26, 2018, The Nation.

Written during the first week of Turkey’s attack on Afrin, Tax’s article describes the pluralistic democracy found there, and frames Erdogan’s attack as motivated by racist hatred and driven by electoral politics.   

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Meredith Tax, “When Women Fight ISIS.” August 18, 2016, New York Times.

While militaries often target women in wartime, as a way of symbolically defiling and disrupting a culture, Kurdish female guerrillas have become empowered through actively taking up self-defense and defense of other women from ISIS, particularly the Yazidis.

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Meredith Tax, "Climate, Solidarity and Resistance," June 1, 2019, Publication of DSA (Democratic Socialists of America).​

An argument for the support by the U.S. Left of movements around the world, such as Rojava, that have a holistic approach to social change, implementing in practice the principles of gender equality, ecology and bottom-up democracy. 

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Debbie Bookchin, “How my father’s ideas helped the Kurds create a new democracy.” June 15, 2018, New York Review of Books.

This article moves back and forth between the historic experience of the Kurds, Ocalan’s discovery of Murray Bookchin’s work, and the politics of Rojava; and the author’s memories of her father and the democratic ideas that are central to his work. 

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Debbie Bookchin, Forward to Make Rojava Green Again  by the Internationalist Commune of Rojava, Nov. 2018

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Debbie Bookchin, “Report from Rojava: What the West Owes Its Best Ally Against ISIS,” April 5, 2019, New York Review of Books.

Writing from Rojava, Bookchin details the end of the war with ISIS and the achievements of the revolution but points to the dangers it still faces from ISIS sleeper cells, Turkish threats, the thousands of ISIS prisoners nobody in the West is dealing with. The West has an obligation to make sure peace negotiations lead to a federal outcome.

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Debbie Bookchin, “The Feminist, Democratic Leftists Our Military is Obliterating,” Feb. 1, 2016, The Nation.

Erdogan’s assault on Kurdish cities in Northeastern Turkey is an attempt to wipe out the most feminist, democratic movement in the Middle East. Turkey’s NATO allies are enabling this assault because of the airbase at Incirlike and fear of refugees.

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Anna-Sara Malmgren & Robert Hockett: “Turkey is murdering its own Kurdish civilians. Will America speak out?’ February 18 2016, Haaretz.

Malmgren and Hockett put together the details of Erdogan’s targeting of Kurdish cities and prove his massacres go beyond his claims of merely responding to the PKK.

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Robert Hockett & Anna-Sara Malmgren, “Feminism across borders: don’t let Afrin become the next Srebrenica.” March 14, 2018, Jerusalem Post.

Hockett and Malmgren discuss Erdogan’s violence against Afrin as explicitly residing along gender fault lines. Afrin’s bottom-up and female-led, secular democracy is the opposite of all Erdogan represents.

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Anya Briy, “Interview: People’s Democratic Congress (HDK) in Turkey: A New Model for Organizing?” February 2019, Jadaliyya.

The People’s Democratic Congress (HDK) is a country-wide coalition platform of left-wing forces in Turkey that contains around thirty organizations, including political parties and trade unions, out of which came out the pro-Kurdish party HDP, the second opposition party in Turkey.

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Anya Briy and Mahir Kurtay interviewing  Ayşe Gökkan and Gülcihan Şimşek, “Interview with the Free Women’s Movement (TJA) in North Kurdistan,” October 23, 2018, openDemocracy

An interview with TJA-KJA representatives in Diyarbakir. The Free Women’s Congress (KJA) was established in 2015 as an umbrella for various women’s initiatives, as well as political parties, NGO’s, culture and faith groups, and local governments.

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Anya Briy, interviewing B.E., “The theory and practice of the Kurdish Women’s Movement,” January 3, 2019, openDemocracy.

An interview with an editor of the Jineoloji Journal in Diyarbakir about theoretical and practical activities of the Kurdish women’s movement in Turkey. The journal is one of the few remaining initiatives by the Kurdish movement that have not been shut down in the wake of the 2015-2016 military offensive by the Turkish state on predominantly Kurdish cities or otherwise repressed since the 2016 failed coup attempt.

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Ozlem Goner, Turkish National Identity and its Outsiders. Routledge, 2017. Book.

 This book examines the ways in which states and nations are constructed and legitimated through defining and managing outsiders. Focusing on Turkey and the municipality of Dersim – a region that has historically combined different outsider identities, including Armenian, Kurdish, and Alevi identities – the author explores the remembering, transformation and mobilization of everyday relations of power and how relationships with the state shape both outsider identities and the conception of the nation itself.